Proper Brushing For Preventive Dental Care

Preventative Dentistry pic
Preventative Dentistry
Image: oakridgedentalnj.com

Dr. Christopher Lillo is a respected Toms River, New Jersey, dentist, who has practiced with the Oak Ridge Dental Group, PA, for more than two decades. Experienced in periodontal treatment, Dr. Christopher Lillo emphasizes the importance of proper at-home teeth and gum care among patients.

The basics elements of teeth and gum care include brushing, flossing, rinsing, and eating the right foods. Brushing should be performed twice each day and, ideally, following each meal. If possible, wait 30 minutes after eating to brush, as this gives any enamel softened by acid in the food time to fully re-harden.

The acids in play are created by bacteria within the plaque coming into contact with food particles. If the acids are not addressed, they can result in cavities. Brushing effectively removes plaque, which is the film of bacteria around the teeth. The key to proper brushing is to position the brush at a 45 degree angle relative to the gum line and using a small circular motion to reach every accessible crevice. Avoid pressing too hard, as this can cause gum damage and lead to other types of infection. Before or after brushing, thoroughly floss as a way of dislodging hidden food particles stuck between the teeth.

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The Importance of Preventive Dental Care for Young Children

Preventative Dentistry pic
Preventative Dentistry
Image: oakridgedentalnj.com

Dr. Christopher Lillo is a Toms River, New Jersey, dentist who offers restorative and cosmetic dental care. As a member of the Oak Ridge Dental Group, PA, Dr. Christopher Lillo provides fillings, crowns, and periodontal treatment, as needed, but emphasizes preventive care to his patients.

Preventive care, such as brushing and flossing, is critical in maintaining healthy teeth and should begin at an early age. Many parents, believing that the baby teeth will be replaced soon, do not place a premium on their young children’s dental care. Unfortunately, this laissez-faire approach is misguided, as the baby teeth function as “place holders” for the permanent teeth that follow. Cavities are contagious, with bacterial infection often transferring from the old teeth via the gums to the newly erupting ones. Children who develop caries in their baby teeth often have decay problems with their adult teeth.

In addition to brushing and flossing, preventive care for infants includes avoiding the use of sippy cups with sugary juices, as well as decreasing the amounts of candy and snacks allowed. In addition, children should visit their dentist for the first time by their first birthday.